Resources

Resources for Studying at Home

A few websites and contacts that are good to know when studying at home.

When you’re working at home and the library announced it was closing, you might have felt like kicking yourself for not taking out every single book you might ever possibly need ever. Just in case. 

But fear not! We’re here to help with some other resources which might help you when you need those extra few secondary sources when writing your essays.

Email your Tutor

They can recommend books and sources for you to use and if you ask nicely, they may be able to help you by scanning in a particular chapter you might need (if they have a copy). Reach out and ask for help - it’s what they’re there for!

The Library - online!

The Library building may be closed but there are still thousands of resources you can access from your very own home! Check out the EBSCO Discovery Service and the Library Catalogue - and select ‘ebooks’! Click here to find out more.

Email your Faculty Librarian!

Each faculty has a dedicated librarian who is there to help you with any questions and queries you may have - especially when it comes to that dreaded bibliography! Find out your faculty librarian here and pop them an email!

Cambridge University Press

Picture credit: Cambridge.org

The Cambridge University Press have made over 700 textbooks free to access online! Take a look and see if there is anything that might be of use to you. Click here to find out more.

Google Books

Picture credit: wikipedia.com

This isn’t always the most reliable of sources, but if you’re searching for a particular quote or chapter, it’s worth seeing if you can find it on Google Books. Some pages are hidden from preview, but you might just strike lucky!

Google Scholar

Picture Credit: wikipedia.com

A more academic version of Google Books, Google Scholar searches academic texts and websites for what you are looking for!

Google Scholar provides a simple way to broadly search for scholarly literature. From one place, you can search across many disciplines and sources: articles, theses, books, abstracts and court opinions, from academic publishers, professional societies, online repositories, universities and other web sites.
Source: Google Scholar

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